One Another

One Another

As people join together with a local church in membership there should be evident an environment of ‘one another-ness.’ As the new member joins they are adding themselves to the body already existent but there is also that acceptance by the local church as another member is grafted by the Holy Spirit into their midst. There is that work that the new member must undertake as they have responsibility as 1 Timothy 4:7 says to exercise themselves onto godliness. Their daily submission to the word of God, following the admonition to pray for one another, and forsaking not the assembling of themselves together. Yet the local body also has made commitment and obligation to new members to help each one to grow towards Christ-like maturity. The command to ‘love one another’ is perhaps one of the most repeated within the New Testament. We are called in Galatians 6:1-2 to bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfil the law of Christ! What a statement and one which we might easily pass over, that to bear one another’s burdens is in fact a fulfilment of the law of Christ. Christianity is very practical! This relationship and the vital importance of maintaining good relationships within the church membership is one that is not a man-made thing simply because even secular societies recognise that it’s better to get on with people than not, or that’s it’s good (or we might more cynically say – it pays) to be nice; but the maintaining of good relationships in the church context is in fact not only a command of God, but it indeed finds its roots in the doctrine of the Trinity. It finds its roots in the very triune nature of God; therefore, as Christians express that loving togetherness with each other they are expressing the very nature of the triune God; three persons, distinct yet united. Men and women are Gods image bearers (Genesis 1:26) and are made for relationship. We are made primarily for a relationship with God, but this ought also to be expressed in that same quality of relationship with each other. In Romans 15:14 Paul writing to the Romans commends them by saying that they are able to admonish one another. In other words they are able to teach one another, warn one another, direct one another and counsel and help one another in their Christian journey. A characteristic of a mature church is one where every member is able to take responsibility to care for other members of it, not just the responsibility of the Pastor or those in leadership, but a church full of mature believers who can help each other and minister to each other. Church is not something which lasts just for Sunday but should be a community of believers growing in Christlikeness together, for Gods glory, and for the extending of His Kingdom on earth. May it be true of my life as of yours (Hebrews 10:24) that we stir one another up onto love, first and foremost, and then also onto good works.